When Should I Use Silent Treatment?

Is it ever OK to give the silent treatment?

Giving someone the silent treatment may not always be such a bad thing.

It may actually be a good way to deal with someone who is acting like a jerk, a new study finds..

What does the silent treatment do to a relationship?

When one or both partners sulk, pout, or refuse to talk, they are exerting a cruel type of power in the relationship that not only shuts out their partner but also communicates that they do not care enough to try to communicate or collaborate. People use the silent treatment to control the situation or conversation.

Is it OK to give your husband the silent treatment?

You may need to reach out to other loved ones or a professional for support, Dr Gonsalkorale says, because your partner cannot provide that while stonewalling you. “Sometimes people giving the silent treatment are so well practiced at it, it doesn’t matter what you do, they are calling the shots.”

Do narcissists give the silent treatment?

The silent treatment is a form of emotional abuse typically employed by people with narcissistic tendencies.

Is Silent Treatment passive aggressive?

The silent treatment is sometimes used as a control mechanism. The silent treatment is a passive-aggressive action where a person feels bad but is unable to express themselves. Their being ‘silent’ still communicates a message.

What drives a narcissist insane?

The thing that drives a narcissist crazy is the lack of control and the lack of a fight. The less you fight back, the less power you can give them over you, the better,” she says. And because they never think they’re wrong, they never apologize.

Why do narcissists punish you?

When a narcissist can keep you confused, they can better manipulate you. By distorting your sense of reality, they can create a reality for you that serves them best. … It is used as a punishment to restore the power imbalance the narcissist feels when you have done or said something they do not like.

Why do narcissist leave you?

Both the narcissist and his partner typically show patterns of insecure attachment stemming from childhood. … Lack of these can lead to “splitting” in extreme cases, so that you may become “all bad, and no good,” by the time the narcissist abandons you.